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Which Element of the Periodic Table Are You?

Periodic table with chemical structures
Periodic Table Science Concept 3D Rendered Illustration. Chemistry Theme.

When you're on the Brickyard, how likely are you to chat with strangers around you?

Think about your time as a student. Were you someone who generally helped others in class or did you need (and receive) help yourself?

While watching NC State athletics, do you tend to keep calm or react strongly?

When going to the campus dining halls, did you go with a large group of people or just a close friend or two?

When you and your friends went out to Hillsborough Street, did you like to plan ahead or act spontaneously?

Which Element of the Periodic Table Are You?
Carbon

You're most like carbon!

You're a well-rounded individual who gets along with most people.

Common Uses: present in all life forms; fossil fuels; graphite in pencils; diamonds

The Science Behind the Questions

When you're on the Brickyard, how likely are you to chat with strangers around you?

If you said you're not likely to chat with strangers, you are more likely to be a noble gas. With a full set of electrons within their outer orbit, noble gases are very inert and tend not to bond with other elements.

Think about your time as a student. Were you someone who generally helped others in class or did you need (and receive) help yourself?

If you helped others in class, you're more likely to give up an electron or two. If you received help, you're more likely to receive an electron. This is based on the premise that an atom of an element is most stable when it either has no electrons in its outer orbit or has a full orbit of eight electrons.

Elements on the left side of the periodic table naturally have only one or two electrons in their outer orbit. Meanwhile, elements on the right side of the table are only a few electrons short of having a full octet of eight electrons. This means that elements on the left side of the table often "give" their few electrons to an element on the right side of the table that needs only a few electrons to have a full octet. This is one of the factors that dictates which elements are most likely to bond together.

While watching NC State athletics, do you tend to keep calm or react strongly?

If you react strongly, you're more likely to be an alkali metal (such as potassium or sodium) or a halogen (such as chlorine). Since alkali metals only have one electron in their outer orbit to get rid of, they are highly reactive. Likewise, halogens only need one more electron to reach their ideal outer orbital state. This means that halogens are also very reactive in their attempt to gain another electron.

When going to the campus dining halls, did you go with a large group of people or just a close friend or two?

If you normally just interact with a friend or two, you are more prone to ionic bonds. You might also be very electronegative.

The two most common types of chemical bonds are either ionic or covalent. Ionic bonds tend to be strong and based on a high electronegativity value. Basic molecules with ionic bonds also tend to have fewer elements.

When you and your friends went out to Hillsborough Street, did you like to plan ahead or act spontaneously?

If you're malleable in a spontaneous situation, you're more likely to be a malleable metal. Because of how the electrons between most metal elements interact, they allow for the atoms to be easily shifted. The free flow of electrons between the atoms also make metals good conductors of electricity.
Chlorine

You're most like chlorine!

You react strongly in some situations (like watching NC State sports), but you've also paired up with others when you need help (or at least an electron).

Common uses: disinfectant; PVC plastics; pharmaceutical manufacturing

The Science Behind the Questions

When you're on the Brickyard, how likely are you to chat with strangers around you?

If you said you're not likely to chat with strangers, you are more likely to be a noble gas. With a full set of electrons within their outer orbit, noble gases are very inert and tend not to bond with other elements.

Think about your time as a student. Were you someone who generally helped others in class or did you need (and receive) help yourself?

If you helped others in class, you're more likely to give up an electron or two. If you received help, you're more likely to receive an electron. This is based on the premise that an atom of an element is most stable when it either has no electrons in its outer orbit or has a full orbit of eight electrons.

Elements on the left side of the periodic table naturally have only one or two electrons in their outer orbit. Meanwhile, elements on the right side of the table are only a few electrons short of having a full octet of eight electrons. This means that elements on the left side of the table often "give" their few electrons to an element on the right side of the table that needs only a few electrons to have a full octet. This is one of the factors that dictates which elements are most likely to bond together.

While watching NC State athletics, do you tend to keep calm or react strongly?

If you react strongly, you're more likely to be an alkali metal (such as potassium or sodium) or a halogen (such as chlorine). Since alkali metals only have one electron in their outer orbit to get rid of, they are highly reactive. Likewise, halogens only need one more electron to reach their ideal outer orbital state. This means that halogens are also very reactive in their attempt to gain another electron.

When going to the campus dining halls, did you go with a large group of people or just a close friend or two?

If you normally just interact with a friend or two, you are more prone to ionic bonds. You might also be very electronegative.

The two most common types of chemical bonds are either ionic or covalent. Ionic bonds tend to be strong and based on a high electronegativity value. Basic molecules with ionic bonds also tend to have fewer elements.

When you and your friends went out to Hillsborough Street, did you like to plan ahead or act spontaneously?

If you're malleable in a spontaneous situation, you're more likely to be a malleable metal. Because of how the electrons between most metal elements interact, they allow for the atoms to be easily shifted. The free flow of electrons between the atoms also make metals good conductors of electricity.
Argon

You're most like argon!

You like to keep to yourself and stay above the fray.

Common uses: incandescent light bulbs; welding; energy-efficient windows

The Science Behind the Questions

When you're on the Brickyard, how likely are you to chat with strangers around you?

If you said you're not likely to chat with strangers, you are more likely to be a noble gas. With a full set of electrons within their outer orbit, noble gases are very inert and tend not to bond with other elements.

Think about your time as a student. Were you someone who generally helped others in class or did you need (and receive) help yourself?

If you helped others in class, you're more likely to give up an electron or two. If you received help, you're more likely to receive an electron. This is based on the premise that an atom of an element is most stable when it either has no electrons in its outer orbit or has a full orbit of eight electrons.

Elements on the left side of the periodic table naturally have only one or two electrons in their outer orbit. Meanwhile, elements on the right side of the table are only a few electrons short of having a full octet of eight electrons. This means that elements on the left side of the table often "give" their few electrons to an element on the right side of the table that needs only a few electrons to have a full octet. This is one of the factors that dictates which elements are most likely to bond together.

While watching NC State athletics, do you tend to keep calm or react strongly?

If you react strongly, you're more likely to be an alkali metal (such as potassium or sodium) or a halogen (such as chlorine). Since alkali metals only have one electron in their outer orbit to get rid of, they are highly reactive. Likewise, halogens only need one more electron to reach their ideal outer orbital state. This means that halogens are also very reactive in their attempt to gain another electron.

When going to the campus dining halls, did you go with a large group of people or just a close friend or two?

If you normally just interact with a friend or two, you are more prone to ionic bonds. You might also be very electronegative.

The two most common types of chemical bonds are either ionic or covalent. Ionic bonds tend to be strong and based on a high electronegativity value. Basic molecules with ionic bonds also tend to have fewer elements.

When you and your friends went out to Hillsborough Street, did you like to plan ahead or act spontaneously?

If you're malleable in a spontaneous situation, you're more likely to be a malleable metal. Because of how the electrons between most metal elements interact, they allow for the atoms to be easily shifted. The free flow of electrons between the atoms also make metals good conductors of electricity.
Fluorine

You're most like fluorine!

You react strongly in some situations (maybe when watching NC State sports?), and you're also likely to keep a smaller circle of friends (who are ionically bonded, of course). Some people have said you're too electronegative.

Common uses: electrical transformers; high-temperature plastics such as nonstick cookware; cable insulation; plumber's tape

The Science Behind the Questions

When you're on the Brickyard, how likely are you to chat with strangers around you?

If you said you're not likely to chat with strangers, you are more likely to be a noble gas. With a full set of electrons within their outer orbit, noble gases are very inert and tend not to bond with other elements.

Think about your time as a student. Were you someone who generally helped others in class or did you need (and receive) help yourself?

If you helped others in class, you're more likely to give up an electron or two. If you received help, you're more likely to receive an electron. This is based on the premise that an atom of an element is most stable when it either has no electrons in its outer orbit or has a full orbit of eight electrons.

Elements on the left side of the periodic table naturally have only one or two electrons in their outer orbit. Meanwhile, elements on the right side of the table are only a few electrons short of having a full octet of eight electrons. This means that elements on the left side of the table often "give" their few electrons to an element on the right side of the table that needs only a few electrons to have a full octet. This is one of the factors that dictates which elements are most likely to bond together.

While watching NC State athletics, do you tend to keep calm or react strongly?

If you react strongly, you're more likely to be an alkali metal (such as potassium or sodium) or a halogen (such as chlorine). Since alkali metals only have one electron in their outer orbit to get rid of, they are highly reactive. Likewise, halogens only need one more electron to reach their ideal outer orbital state. This means that halogens are also very reactive in their attempt to gain another electron.

When going to the campus dining halls, did you go with a large group of people or just a close friend or two?

If you normally just interact with a friend or two, you are more prone to ionic bonds. You might also be very electronegative.

The two most common types of chemical bonds are either ionic or covalent. Ionic bonds tend to be strong and based on a high electronegativity value. Basic molecules with ionic bonds also tend to have fewer elements.

When you and your friends went out to Hillsborough Street, did you like to plan ahead or act spontaneously?

If you're malleable in a spontaneous situation, you're more likely to be a malleable metal. Because of how the electrons between most metal elements interact, they allow for the atoms to be easily shifted. The free flow of electrons between the atoms also make metals good conductors of electricity.
Aluminum

You're most like aluminum!

You're a pretty malleable person who can go with the flow, especially when hanging out with others.

Common uses: domestic cans and foils; metal alloys for airplanes; electrical transmission lines

The Science Behind the Questions

When you're on the Brickyard, how likely are you to chat with strangers around you?

If you said you're not likely to chat with strangers, you are more likely to be a noble gas. With a full set of electrons within their outer orbit, noble gases are very inert and tend not to bond with other elements.

Think about your time as a student. Were you someone who generally helped others in class or did you need (and receive) help yourself?

If you helped others in class, you're more likely to give up an electron or two. If you received help, you're more likely to receive an electron. This is based on the premise that an atom of an element is most stable when it either has no electrons in its outer orbit or has a full orbit of eight electrons.

Elements on the left side of the periodic table naturally have only one or two electrons in their outer orbit. Meanwhile, elements on the right side of the table are only a few electrons short of having a full octet of eight electrons. This means that elements on the left side of the table often "give" their few electrons to an element on the right side of the table that needs only a few electrons to have a full octet. This is one of the factors that dictates which elements are most likely to bond together.

While watching NC State athletics, do you tend to keep calm or react strongly?

If you react strongly, you're more likely to be an alkali metal (such as potassium or sodium) or a halogen (such as chlorine). Since alkali metals only have one electron in their outer orbit to get rid of, they are highly reactive. Likewise, halogens only need one more electron to reach their ideal outer orbital state. This means that halogens are also very reactive in their attempt to gain another electron.

When going to the campus dining halls, did you go with a large group of people or just a close friend or two?

If you normally just interact with a friend or two, you are more prone to ionic bonds. You might also be very electronegative.

The two most common types of chemical bonds are either ionic or covalent. Ionic bonds tend to be strong and based on a high electronegativity value. Basic molecules with ionic bonds also tend to have fewer elements.

When you and your friends went out to Hillsborough Street, did you like to plan ahead or act spontaneously?

If you're malleable in a spontaneous situation, you're more likely to be a malleable metal. Because of how the electrons between most metal elements interact, they allow for the atoms to be easily shifted. The free flow of electrons between the atoms also make metals good conductors of electricity.
Potassium

You're most like potassium!

You react strongly in some situations (like watching NC State sports). You're likely to give a hand (or at least an electron) to those in need.

Common uses: fertilizers; detergents and liquid soaps; glass manufacturing

The Science Behind the Questions

When you're on the Brickyard, how likely are you to chat with strangers around you?

If you said you're not likely to chat with strangers, you are more likely to be a noble gas. With a full set of electrons within their outer orbit, noble gases are very inert and tend not to bond with other elements.

Think about your time as a student. Were you someone who generally helped others in class or did you need (and receive) help yourself?

If you helped others in class, you're more likely to give up an electron or two. If you received help, you're more likely to receive an electron. This is based on the premise that an atom of an element is most stable when it either has no electrons in its outer orbit or has a full orbit of eight electrons.

Elements on the left side of the periodic table naturally have only one or two electrons in their outer orbit. Meanwhile, elements on the right side of the table are only a few electrons short of having a full octet of eight electrons. This means that elements on the left side of the table often "give" their few electrons to an element on the right side of the table that needs only a few electrons to have a full octet. This is one of the factors that dictates which elements are most likely to bond together.

While watching NC State athletics, do you tend to keep calm or react strongly?

If you react strongly, you're more likely to be an alkali metal (such as potassium or sodium) or a halogen (such as chlorine). Since alkali metals only have one electron in their outer orbit to get rid of, they are highly reactive. Likewise, halogens only need one more electron to reach their ideal outer orbital state. This means that halogens are also very reactive in their attempt to gain another electron.

When going to the campus dining halls, did you go with a large group of people or just a close friend or two?

If you normally just interact with a friend or two, you are more prone to ionic bonds. You might also be very electronegative.

The two most common types of chemical bonds are either ionic or covalent. Ionic bonds tend to be strong and based on a high electronegativity value. Basic molecules with ionic bonds also tend to have fewer elements.

When you and your friends went out to Hillsborough Street, did you like to plan ahead or act spontaneously?

If you're malleable in a spontaneous situation, you're more likely to be a malleable metal. Because of how the electrons between most metal elements interact, they allow for the atoms to be easily shifted. The free flow of electrons between the atoms also make metals good conductors of electricity.

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