Marine, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences

May 24, 2018  |  Research and Innovation

A Better B1 Building Block

A B1 precursor called cHET can be easily taken up and used in extremely small concentrations by phytoplankton and plants.

May 23, 2018  |  Research and Innovation

How Frequent Hurricanes Change Estuarial Ecosystems

An NC State researcher explains how increased hurricane frequency can lead to increased algal blooms, fish kills and dead zones in estuaries.

Apr 23, 2018  |  Marine, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences

NC State Researchers Predict Active 2018 Hurricane Season for East Coast

The 2018 season should see above-average activity, with 14 to 18 tropical storms and hurricanes forming in the Atlantic basin.

Mar 5, 2018  |  Honors and Awards

Two Sciences Faculty Named 2017-2018 University Faculty Scholars

NC State’s 2017-2018 class of University Faculty Scholars includes faculty from the Departments of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences and Biological Sciences.

Feb 28, 2018  |  Research and Innovation

Researchers Create More Complete Picture of Freshwater Toxic Algal Blooms

A two-year study of North Carolina’s Jordan Lake found that multiple cyanotoxins from toxic algal blooms are present year-round, albeit in very low concentrations.

Feb 26, 2018  |  Magazine

What Matters to Us

Our college is preparing a new generation of well-rounded scientists to change the world. Find out what we're doing and how you can help.

Feb 20, 2018  |  Quiz

Quiz: Do You Know Snow?

Test your knowledge of all things snow with this wintry quiz.

Dec 8, 2017  |  Our People

Meet Chris McGahan, Our New Dean

Program by program, Chris McGahan wants to create an extraordinary College of Sciences.

Dec 4, 2017  |  Marine, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences

Protecting Water Quality

Chris Osburn studies the chemistry of lake ecosystems to gather information that policymakers can use to protect water quality.

Nov 8, 2017  |  Research and Innovation

“Space” Invader: Invasive Marine Fouling Species Crowds Out Natives

An invasive species of tunicate known as Clavelina oblonga crowds out and overgrows other marine fouling species and reduces biodiversity.